Tagged as: Fighting Cancer

Surviving Two Bouts of Pancreatic Cancer With Dr. Steven Lewis Part 2

Dr. Steven Lewis

Dr. Steven Lewis received a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from Stanford University in 1977 and is a visiting professor of clinical biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

He was in superb life-long health, until he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a “ripple effect” that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven.

The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept.

Listen to Part 2 of Steven’s inspiring story!

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Surviving Two Bouts of Pancreatic Cancer With Dr. Steven Lewis Part 1

Dr. Steven Lewis

Dr. Steven Lewis received a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from Stanford University in 1977 and is a visiting professor of clinical biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

He was in superb life-long health, until he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a “ripple effect” that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven.

The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept.

Listen to Part 1 of Steven’s inspiring story!

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Dr. Steven Lewis, Cancer Survivor

Dr. Steven LewisDr. Steven Lewis received a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from Stamford University in 1977 and is a visiting professor of clinical biomedical science in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton.

He was in superb life-long health, until he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, a disease with a survival rate of only 5%. In spite of this, Steven and his wife struggled to achieve and deliberately maintain an extremely positive attitude. This choice started a “ripple effect” that created an exceptionally caring and upbeat community of family, relatives and friends and enabled this community to return even more positive energy to Steven.Dr. Steven Lewis

The story became even more intense when Steven endured a second bout of pancreatic cancer that metastasized to his liver. Surviving a second bout of pancreatic cancer is so rare that no statistics are kept. Today, Steven is cancer free, in excellent health and works out strenuously. Virtually all of us, at some point, will experience extreme life difficulties involving circumstances such as severe illness, injuries, accidents, divorce or natural disasters.

A positive attitude can help us think clearly, be solution oriented and ultimately prevail. Whether Steven physically survived or not, an attitude of complaint and negativity would have shattered his emotional life and that of his family. Steven’s choice was to stay positive and upbeat in spite of his situation. What would you have done?

Purchase Dr. Steven Lewis’ book on Amazon:

The Ripple Effect: How a Positive Attitude and a Caring Community Helped Save My Life

 

 

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Dorothy Vernon Brown

Dorothy Vernon BrownIt’s the worst news you ever want to hear. ‘I think you have leukemia’, the young doctor told her. 

That was August 2013 when Dorothy Vernon Brown was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML).

As a devoted mother, wife, entrepreneur and serial volunteer it was a kick to the gut.

Her treatments have gone well but Dorothy, like many minorities on the donor list, is in DESPERATE need of a stem cell transplant to continue to live and prevent a relapse. Less than 25% of patients who need a stem cell transplant will find a match in their family; regrettably Dorothy is one of these.

Her best chance of finding a match is to find a donor from her own ethnic group. She is of Jamaican heritage with a mixed background of Black and Irish.

Dorothy urgently need the help from the Jamaican/West Indian community and young men (women not excluded) between the ages of 17 and 35 to become a donor with OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network (www.OneMatch.ca).

This will increase her chances of finding the optimal donor. The OneMatch Stem Cell and Marrow Network consists of 72% Caucasian and 28% ethnic origins. Only 1% is black.

You may contact Dorothy Vernon Brown at:

www.DonorDrive4Dorothy.org

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